Re: [LAU] Raspberry Pi and real-time, low-latency audio

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To: Jeremy Jongepier <jeremy@...>
Cc: linux-audio-user <linux-audio-user@...>
Date: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 - 9:19 am

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Just a quick note:
I got my M-Audio Fast Track Ultra 8R working with the pi following the
wiki. It's a USB 2.0 device.

Thank you!

--Felix

2013/4/16 Jeremy Jongepier

> On 04/16/2013 12:39 AM, Len Ovens wrote:

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Just a quick note:I got my M-Audio Fast Track U=
ltra 8R working with the pi following the wiki. It's a USB 2.0 device.<=
/div>Thank you!
--Felix2013/4/16 Jeremy Jongepier <jeremy@autostatic.com>
On 04/16/2013 12:39 AM, Le=
n Ovens wrote:

On Mon, April 15, 2013 12:27 am, Jeremy Jongepier wrote:

Though making an enclosure and buying the switches (that can handle
being
stomped) would probably cost as much as a premade controller anyway. Are
you going to add any other controls? (pots or other programing kinds of
things) or just use presets?

I bought some cheap switches and I've got some broken things lying
around and my ultimate goal would be to make a simple USB-MIDI
footswitch with some extra knobs to adjust parameters. But that will be
a long term project (two kids, solderingironophobia).

I thought the R-Pi has GPi/os. Is it not possible to use switches
connected direct?

Yes that's also possible. There are even PCB designs available of MIDI =
expansion boards, maybe I'll take a look at that. Apparently it's v=
ery cheap these days to have PCB's made.

Is that a Dan Armstrong? Or does someone else make clear (and very
heavy)
body guitars?

Answered this in another mail.

Ya, Last D.A. I saw was about 1974. It was a bass, but was short scale so
the intonation was problematic. It was heavy. The owner went from that to
a Rick.

Ampeg has reissued the Dan Armstrong model so you can still get them. They&=
#39;re way more expensive though. But they're beautiful guitars with th=
e double cut and the interchangeable pickups.

In addition, there are some manufacturers
that use PMMA/acrylic/lucite/perspex bodies. The most well-known at the
moment is ECG (Electrical Guitar Company). They have two lucite
signature models with aluminum necks (how awesome is that), the Brent
Hinds (Mastodon) Custom and one of the coolest contemporary guitars, the
King Buzzo (Melvins) Standard:
http://www.=
electricalguitarcompany.com/index.php/model/King-Buzzo-St=
andard/fuseaction/models.77d7eb47.htm

They look nice. How easy is it to keep them clean? Or are finger marks not<=
br>
visible more than 5 feet away anyway?

I never clean the body, still looks good after like 4 years.

=A0Says 9 pounds... I haven't weighed

any of mine...Hohner (the jack) headless - 7lbs - Rickenbacker bass - 10
lbs

That must be a 400X ;)

Jeremy

=A0- squire katana bass (ex rental now fretless) 7.3 lbs So weight is not

an issue.

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Messages in current thread:
Re: [LAU] Raspberry Pi and real-time, low-latency audio, Jeremy Jongepier, (Tue Apr 16, 7:19 am)
Re: [LAU] Raspberry Pi and real-time, low-latency audio, Felix Homann, (Tue Apr 16, 9:19 am)
Re: [LAU] Raspberry Pi and real-time, low-latency audio, Jeremy Jongepier, (Tue Apr 16, 9:27 am)