Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound

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To: Ivan K <ivan_521521@...>
Cc: linux-audio-user@lists.linuxaudio.org <linux-audio-user@...>
Date: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 - 4:57 am

On 07/16/2012 11:30 AM, Ivan K wrote:

"Envy 24 Control" will directly control your soundcard. Make sure you go
to the "Analog Volume" tab (I think that is the name) and get the output
volume up in each output channel you want to use. You do not normally
need to touch or use the internal chipset mixer.

If you want to use a Jack based application you would need to point jack
to the proper soundcard. What I usually do is to look at the output (in
a terminal) of "cat /proc/asound/cards", this will show you a list of
the cards your system recognized. In my laptop for example I see:

----
$ cat /proc/asound/cards
0 [Intel ]: HDA-Intel - HDA Intel
HDA Intel at 0xf2420000 irq 44
1 [NVidia ]: HDA-Intel - HDA NVidia
HDA NVidia at 0xcdefc000 irq 16
29 [ThinkPadEC ]: ThinkPad EC - ThinkPad Console Audio Control
ThinkPad Console Audio Control at EC reg 0x30, fw
6MHT38WW-1.13
----

Just to test if things start you could start jack from the command line
like this:

----
jackd -R -d alsa -d hw:Intel
----

(just replace "Intel" with the name that is between '[]' in the card you
want to use)

Jack should start cleanly and just sit there waiting for clients to
connect. If that hurdle is behind you you can start qjackctl (a gui
front end) instead, change the "Interface" name in the Setup panel to
hw:Intel (or whatever is the name of your card), select "Realtime" and
start Jack.

To test you could, for example, install Hydrogen, start it and use one
of its demo patterns to test sound. You might need to go to the
preferences and make sure it is using Jack as the backend. Also, make
sure that its outputs are connected to the Jack output ports in
qjackctl's "Connect" pane... Press play and you should get sound out of
your card (if the analog volumes are up).

If you want to test with aplay and output directly to ALSA then you also
need to tell aplay which card to use. A basic command in my case would
be "aplay --device=hw:Intel soundfile". If your soundfile is not exactly
of the right type aplay may complain, and you can usually make it happy
again by saying "aplay --device=plughw:Intel soundfile" instead, which
will automatically convert formats...

If you want to, say, play sounds from your internet browser (and from
most system programs) you will deal with Pulse Audio. Again, like
before, you will need to tell it which card to use. Depending on which
window manager you use you might have a small speaker icon somewhere
which you can use to left click and set the overall volume. Usually if
you right click you can start the "Sound Preferences" panel which will
let you set which card is used for input and output. On Fedora 17 you
can go to the System Preferences dialog and select "Sound" (if I
remember correctly) and start the same Pulse Audio Manager.

Best of lucks!
-- Fernando
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Messages in current thread:
Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound, Robin Paulson, (Mon Jul 16, 3:59 am)
Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound, Charles Henry, (Mon Jul 16, 4:09 pm)
Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound, Fernando Lopez-Lezcano, (Mon Jul 16, 5:15 pm)
Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound, Kevin Cosgrove, (Fri Jul 20, 7:06 pm)
Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound, Fernando Lopez-Lezcano, (Tue Jul 17, 4:57 am)
Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound, Fernando Lopez-Lezcano, (Wed Jul 18, 6:33 pm)
Re: [LAU] Installed Fedora17, now trying to play sound, Paul Davis, (Mon Jul 16, 10:53 am)